The Weathering Report #7: Ecocritical Experiments at Bronte Beach

DATE & LOCATION OF OBSERVATIONS
Thursday December 15, 2016
Bronte Beach, NSW

ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS
Cool and cloudy early-summer day, with intermittent light rain and light winds. Jennifer Hamilton (1/5th of Weathering) took her NYU Sydney “Readings in Contemporary Literary Theory: Ecocriticism” students to the beach. We gathered barefoot, put our toes in the water and considered what they’ve learned in the semester. The water was warmer than the air. The waves were big and stormy.

FORECAST
How can we translate theoretical learning and the reading of fiction into conventional professions such as journalism, NGO service and policy making?

LATEST WEATHERING ACTIVITY
Choose an envelope. Engage in considering your body and weather. Standing sitting raising arms up, reflect. How is the weather different in different postures? How can you feel the weather and the world in your breath? Images from this activity are included below.

We also played the Game of Global Futures as a way of escaping the rain.

SATELLITE IMAGES

2016-12-15-17-01-53

img_20170110_153731717

img_20170110_153749625

img_20170110_153827842

2016-12-15-18-11-26

WARNINGS CURRENT
Overheard:

“When I breathe I feel cleansed, as though the dirtiness of my body gets exhaled”

“When I breathe I feel like the dirt is coming inward”

“Let us go to a cafe and have pizza and tea and shelter from the rain and play the Game of Global Futures”

“President Beyoncé”


WEATHER MAPS
Thinking about the waves as displaced weathers (See “Weather Maps” on https://weatherings.wordpress.com/2016/11/27/the-weathering-report-5-the-weather-underwater-wave-weather/) took on a new dimension in this session. The body of water known as the Pacific Ocean connects Australia to the USA. In putting our toes in the water while weathering we were experiencing that connection.

LIVE READINGS
Tsing, Anna & Pollman, Elizabeth. “Global Futures: The Game”. Daniel Rosenberg and Susan Harding (eds), Histories of the Future (Durham: Duke University Press, 2005): 105-122.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Scroll to top